The Mythic Archives
skeletal:

FIGURES OF LORE | jörð, norse mythology     ↳ requested by anon

In Norse mythology, Jörð (Icelandic ”earth”, pronounced [ˈjörð] or “yurd” and from Old Norse jǫrð, pronounced [ˈjɔrð], sometimes Anglicized as Jord or Jorth; also called Jarð, jɑrð as in Old East Norse), is a female jötunn. She is the mother of Thor and the personification of the Earth. Fjörgyn and Hlóðyn are considered to be other names for Jörð. Jörð is reckoned a goddess, like other jötnar who coupled with the gods. Jörð’s name appears in skaldic poetry both as a poetic term for the land and in kennings for Thor.

skeletal:

FIGURES OF LORE | jörð, norse mythology
    ↳ requested by anon

In Norse mythologyJörð (Icelandic ”earth”, pronounced [ˈjörð] or “yurd” and from Old Norse jǫrð, pronounced [ˈjɔrð], sometimes Anglicized as Jord or Jorth; also called Jarðjɑrð as in Old East Norse), is a female jötunn. She is the mother of Thor and the personification of the EarthFjörgyn and Hlóðyn are considered to be other names for Jörð. Jörð is reckoned a goddess, like other jötnar who coupled with the gods. Jörð’s name appears in skaldic poetry both as a poetic term for the land and in kennings for Thor.

hindumythology:

Rudra (howler) is considered the god of wind and storm — and one of the forms of Shiva! 

hindumythology:

Rudra (howler) is considered the god of wind and storm — and one of the forms of Shiva! 

mylifeasthebeast:

Scáthach is a figure in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology. She is a legendary Scottish warrior woman and martial arts teacher who trains the legendary Ulster hero Cú Chulainn in the arts of combat. Texts describe her homeland as Scotland (Alpae); she is especially associated with the Isle of Skye, where her residence Dún Scáith

mylifeasthebeast:

Scáthach is a figure in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology. She is a legendary Scottish warrior woman and martial arts teacher who trains the legendary Ulster hero Cú Chulainn in the arts of combat. Texts describe her homeland as Scotland (Alpae); she is especially associated with the Isle of Skye, where her residence Dún Scáith

worldofmythology:

Bakezori
In Japanese mythology, the Bakezori is a Tsukomogami in the form of a zori sandal. If mistreated, the Bakezori was said to run through the house at night yelling ”kararin, kororin, kankororin!”
Image: Yokai: bake-zori by ~niban-deidara-n-chan

worldofmythology:

Bakezori

In Japanese mythology, the Bakezori is a Tsukomogami in the form of a zori sandal. If mistreated, the Bakezori was said to run through the house at night yelling kararin, kororin, kankororin!

Image: Yokai: bake-zori by ~niban-deidara-n-chan

doyouspeakwerewolf:

The wulver is a kind of werewolf that is exclusively part of the folklore of the Shetland Islands of Scotland. The wulver kept to itself and was not aggressive if left in peace. Unlike most ‘werewolves’ the Wulver is not a shapeshifter and is not nor was it ever a human being. It appears to be a sort of immortal spirit. Jessie Saxby, in Shetland Traditional Lore (Chapter 9), writes, “The Wulver was a creature like a man with a wolf’s head. He had short brown hair all over him. His home was a cave dug out of the side of a steep knowe, half-way up a hill. He didn’t bother folk if folk didn’t bother him. He was fond of fishing, and had a small rock in the deep water which is known to this day as the ‘Wulver’s Stane’. There he would sit fishing sillaks and piltaks for hour after hour. He was reported to have frequently left a few fish on the window-sill of some poor body.”

A similar un-hostile werewolf is the Faoladh from Irish folklore. The Faoladh was said to protect children and stand guard over wounded men.

Quetzalcoatl is a Mesoamerican deity whose name comes from the Nahuatl language and has the meaning of “feathered serpent”. Among the Aztecs, whose beliefs are the best-documented in the historical sources, Quetzalcoatl was related to gods of the wind, of Venus, of the dawn, of merchants and of arts, crafts and knowledge. He was also the patron god of the Aztec priesthood, of learning and knowledge. Quetzalcoatl is credited with having created the current race of mankind. Usually, our current time was considered the fifth sun, the previous four having been destroyed by flood, fire and the like. Quetzalcoatl went to Mictlan, the underworld, and created fifth-world mankind from the bones of the previous races using his own blood, from a wound he inflicted on his earlobes, calves, tongue, and penis, to imbue the bones with new life. One Aztec story claims that Quetzalcoatl was tricked by Tezcatlipoca into becoming drunk and sleeping with a celibate priestess (in some accounts, his sister) and then burned himself to death out of remorse. His heart became the morning star.

Kami

fantasticallore:

image

Origin: Japan

Kami are spirits in the Shinto faith. It is said that there are eight million Kami; eight million implying an infinite number. Some are similar to humans in appearance, while others are nature spirits that represent the energy of a mountain or a stream. Some Kami may even be ancestors of the royal family and even occupations have a patron Kami.

Pictured above is Amaterasu, one of the more well known Kami.

dojicons:

The Sin-you, (Also called Hiai Chai, Chiai Tung, or Kai Tsi) is a mythical Chinese chimerical creature known throughout various East Asian cultures, and is often compared to the Qilin.
The appearance of the Sin-you is similar to that of a Qilin, but more feral and imposing. It is a large quadruped with a feline or ovine body, a shaggy mane, and is either depicted with hooves or feline paws (the latter often to stress its difference from the Qilin). In has a single, unbranching horn in the center of its head, like a western unicorn. The Sin-you’s eyes are said to be very intense and imposing, figuratively burning into whomever it gazes at in a predatory fashion.
The Sin-you is highly symbolic of justice, and is believed to have the power to know if a person is lying or know if they are guilty with a glance. It sometimes depicted at court beside the ruler or judge: if a person told a falsehood in its presence, it would leap forward and impale the perjurer though the heart with its horn. In other instances, the judge would put convicted murderers before the Sin-you, who would slay them in the same fashion if they were truly the perpetrator, but leave the innocent unharmed.

dojicons:

The Sin-you, (Also called Hiai Chai, Chiai Tung, or Kai Tsi) is a mythical Chinese chimerical creature known throughout various East Asian cultures, and is often compared to the Qilin.

The appearance of the Sin-you is similar to that of a Qilin, but more feral and imposing. It is a large quadruped with a feline or ovine body, a shaggy mane, and is either depicted with hooves or feline paws (the latter often to stress its difference from the Qilin). In has a single, unbranching horn in the center of its head, like a western unicorn. The Sin-you’s eyes are said to be very intense and imposing, figuratively burning into whomever it gazes at in a predatory fashion.

The Sin-you is highly symbolic of justice, and is believed to have the power to know if a person is lying or know if they are guilty with a glance. It sometimes depicted at court beside the ruler or judge: if a person told a falsehood in its presence, it would leap forward and impale the perjurer though the heart with its horn. In other instances, the judge would put convicted murderers before the Sin-you, who would slay them in the same fashion if they were truly the perpetrator, but leave the innocent unharmed.

dojicons:

A huli jing (Chinese: 狐狸精; pinyin: húli jīng) are fox spirits from Chinese mythology. Huli jing are akin to European fairies and can be either good or bad spirits. In modern Mandarin and Cantonese profanity, the term “huli jing” describes a woman who seduces married/romantically-involved men.
In Chinese mythology, these fox spirits are believed to be capable of obtaining a human form, magical powers, and immortality.
Most depictions of huli jings depict them as females who appear as young, beautiful women. These foxes are often seen as dangerous, however some stories depict them in love stories between a fox appearing as a beautiful girl and a young human male.
Huli jings are also used to explain the incidence of attacks in koro, a culture-bound syndrome found in southern China and Malaysia

dojicons:

A huli jing (Chinese: 狐狸精; pinyin: húli jīng) are fox spirits from Chinese mythology. Huli jing are akin to European fairies and can be either good or bad spirits. In modern Mandarin and Cantonese profanity, the term “huli jing” describes a woman who seduces married/romantically-involved men.

In Chinese mythology, these fox spirits are believed to be capable of obtaining a human form, magical powers, and immortality.

Most depictions of huli jings depict them as females who appear as young, beautiful women. These foxes are often seen as dangerous, however some stories depict them in love stories between a fox appearing as a beautiful girl and a young human male.

Huli jings are also used to explain the incidence of attacks in koro, a culture-bound syndrome found in southern China and Malaysia

itmovesmemorelol:

THE THREE MÓRRÍGNA were the three great queens of the Túatha Dé Danann. They were called Badb, Macha and Ana. Any of them could bear the title Mórrígu meaning ‘great queen’ but the title was especially applied to Ana. They appear to have each embodied versions of a sense of impelling vehemence held manifest in armies, battles, crows, horses, queens, rainstorms, rivers, seeresses, wailing winds, warrior-women, wolves and other fierce animals. Badb was the awesome sister who disconcerted enemies and foretold impending doom.  Macha was a overwhelming sister who outran, defeated and victoriously consumed the corpses of adversaries.  Anu was the nourishing sister who fostered and encouraged brave warriors.  At the First Battle of Mag Tuired at midsummer, the three of them made fiery rainstorms. They may also have been thought to haunt raging rivers. One of them stands astride a river when she unites with the Dagda on Samhain Eve. The Three Sisters is the name given in Ireland to the River Barrow, the Nore and the Suir. It was into the River Barrow that the cremated remains of the Morrigan’s son were cast.
source: Celtic Mythology

itmovesmemorelol:

THE THREE MÓRRÍGNA were the three great queens of the Túatha Dé Danann. They were called Badb, Macha and Ana. Any of them could bear the title Mórrígu meaning ‘great queen’ but the title was especially applied to Ana. They appear to have each embodied versions of a sense of impelling vehemence held manifest in armies, battles, crows, horses, queens, rainstorms, rivers, seeresses, wailing winds, warrior-women, wolves and other fierce animals.

Badb was the awesome sister who disconcerted enemies and foretold impending doom.
Macha was a overwhelming sister who outran, defeated and victoriously consumed the corpses of adversaries.
Anu was the nourishing sister who fostered and encouraged brave warriors.

At the First Battle of Mag Tuired at midsummer, the three of them made fiery rainstorms. They may also have been thought to haunt raging rivers. One of them stands astride a river when she unites with the Dagda on Samhain Eve. The Three Sisters is the name given in Ireland to the River Barrow, the Nore and the Suir. It was into the River Barrow that the cremated remains of the Morrigan’s son were cast.

source: Celtic Mythology